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Launched 09/04/2011

Latest update 10/03/2014


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Graveyard Memorial Inscriptions
What's in the database
8,837 People
6,202 Demography entries
2,214 Events
1,121 Marriages
415 Properties
410 Photographs
Completed projects ...
  • Properties 1841-1911
  • Demography records 1841-1911 (village only)
  • Cemetery & Graveyard burials
  • Memorial and graveyard inscriptions
Work in progress ...
  • Demography records 1841-1911 (parish)
  • Marriages within the Elham parish
  • Audio/verbal accounts by Elham residents
Coming soon ...
  • Mapping of all properties within the Elham parish
  • List of artefacts
Future projects ...
  • Audio village tour
  • Complete list of shops - past and present
What's new!
Arthur Frederick Broadbridge
Elham resident and diplomat
Charles Alfred Fortin
Elham assistant surgeon
William Lewis Cowley
Elham resident and author
Graveyard burials
John Midgeley
Henry Clayson
STATS - Facts & Trivia
Windlass Cottage Title Deeds
Church Cottage history back to 1720
Anthony Eden
Prime Minister and Elham resident
The monumental task of deciphering and recording the details on all the memorials in the graveyard has been completed by our dedicated team of historians. Our chairman Derek Boughton has also spent many hours overseeing the operation, correlating the data and checking for errors. The results of their labours can be seen on the burials page.

Elham beat off stiff competition for the title of Kent Village of the year 2011 organised by Action with Communities in Rural Kent.

Censuses for outlying communities in the parish will be rolled out gradually. Check out the stats page for interesting facts and

trivia about the village. We still need your help so please send us any information relating to Elham that may be of interest.

Les Ames hits out
Les Ames in action

Elham resident Les Ames in action for England against the West Indies in 1939. He was one of the finer wicketkeeper - batsmen and played for Kent CCC.


Abbot's Fireside c 1450
Abbot's Fireside

The Abbot's Fireside is one of the older buildings in the village and probably dates back to the mid fifteenth century.


Audrey attends school
Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn (left) lived in Orchard Cottage (Five Bells) for five years in her childhood (1935-1940) and attended the local village schools. She took ballet lessons and dreamed of becoming a prima ballerina. I wonder what became of her?


George V Playing Field
Play for Elham

Dave Lee opens Elham's brand new playground with a sensory garden and a pretty flower meadow created by the Play for Elham charity. 21st November 2010

Swing Riots of 1830
Swing Riots

The machine breaking that led to the riots of August 1830 onwards started in the Elham Parish, writes our historian Derek Boughton, who has made a lifetime's study of the subject.

Elham residents were prominent in the gangs that sought out the new fangled threshing machines and destroyed them. Some of them cost the not inconsiderable sum for the day of £100. Full Story

Rose & Crown 1729

Probate Inventory of Thomas Monger, late of Elham, victualler, intestate, 21 November 1729. Kitchen, Fore-Parlour, Hall, Back Parlour, Maid’s Chamber, Justice Room, Seal Chamber, Rose Chamber, Brewhouse, Buttery, Cellar. Inventory total £74-19-7. The house is fully furnished, and there are 15 pint pots, 12 quart pots, and 17 glasses. There is a copper valued at £1-5-0, and a pipe kiln, in the brewhouse, but there is no beer or wine listed at all. He would appear to have ceased trading since providing the churchwardens with wine earlier in the year. The inventory was shown in court on the following day, 22 November. Edward Maytham must have taken over soon after. CKS: PRC 11/79/46:

England cap 1953

Elham resident Derek Ufton was awarded his only England cap against a team from the Rest of Europe. England 4 (Mullen 2, Mortensen, Ramsey) Rest of Europe 4 (Boniperti 2, Kubala 2)

England: Merrick, Ramsey, Eckersley, W Wright (capt.), Ufton, Dickinson, S Matthews, Mortensen, Lofthouse, Quixall, Mullen

ROE: Zemen, Navarro, Hanappi, Cajkowski, Posipal, Ocwirk (capt.), Boniperti, Kubala, Nordahl, Vukas, Zebec, Beara

England Players

Odo of Bayeaux 1067

He was the son of William the Conqueror's mother Herleva, and Herluin de Conteville. Although he was an ordained Christian cleric, he is best known as a warrior and statesman. He found ships for the invasion of England and is one of the very few proven Companions of William the Conqueror known to have fought at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The Bayeux Tapestry, probably commissioned by him to adorn his own cathedral, appears to labour the point that he did not actually fight, that is to say shed blood, at Hastings, but rather encouraged the troops from the rear. The Latin annotation embroidered onto the Tapestry above his image reads: "Hic Odo Eps (Episcopus) Baculu(m) Tenens Confortat Pueros", in English "Here Odo the Bishop holding a club strengthens the boys". It seems that his clerical status forbade him from using a sword. He was accompanied by William the carrier of his crozier and a retinue of servants and members of his household. In 1067 Odo became earl of Kent, and for some years he was a trusted royal minister. On some occasions when William was absent (back in Normandy), he served as de facto regent of England, and at times he led the royal forces against rebellions (e.g. the Revolt of the Earls): the precise sphere of his powers is not certain, however. There are also other occasions when he accompanied William back to Normandy. During this time Odo acquired vast estates in England, larger in extent than any one except the king: he had land in 23 counties, primarily in the south east and in East Anglia.

In 1076 Odo was tried in front of a large and senior assembly over the course of three days at Penenden Heath in Kent for defrauding the Crown and the Diocese of Canterbury. At the conclusion of the trial he was forced to return a number of properties and his assets were re-apportioned. In 1082 he was suddenly disgraced and imprisoned for having planned a military expedition to Italy. His motivations are not certain. Chroniclers writing a generation later said Odo desired to make himself Pope, but the contemporary evidence is ambiguous. Whatever the reason, Odo spent the next five years in prison, and his English estates were taken back by the king, as was his office as Earl of Kent: Odo was not however deposed as Bishop of Bayeux. William, on his deathbed in 1087, was reluctantly persuaded by his brother Robert, Count of Mortain to release Odo. After the king's death Odo returned to his earldom and soon organized a rebellion in support of William's son Robert Curthose, who had been made Duke of Normandy. The Rebellion of 1088 failed and William Rufus permitted Odo to leave the kingdom. Afterwards, Odo remained in the service of Robert in Normandy. He joined the First Crusade, and started in the duke's company for Palestine, but died on the way at Palermo in January or February 1097.

Little good is recorded of Odo. It was recorded that his vast wealth was gained by extortion and robbery. His ambitions were boundless and his morals lax. However, like many prelates of his age, he was a patron of learning and the arts. He was also a great architect. He founded the Abbaye de Troarn in 1059 and rebuilt the cathedral of his see, and is likely to have commissioned the celebrated Bayeux tapestry. He may also have sponsored an early version of The Song of Roland. More certain is his development of the cathedral school in Bayeux, and his patronage of a number of younger men who later became prominent prelates.

Wikipedia